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Publications:

ARRL 8th Computer Networking Conference 1989

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This proceeding is available on CD-ROM


Location:
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Coordinators:
Andy Freeborn, N0CCZ
Lt. Col. Doug Brower, N0HJT
Bdale Garbee, N3EUA
Paul L. Rinaldo, W4RI

Hosted by:
Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Association (TAPR)
Academy ARC
USAFA Cadet Radio Club
Rocky Mountain Packet Radio Association (RMPRA)
American Radio Relay League (ARRL)

Abstracts:
8th Computer Networking Conference
October 7, 1989

A Packet Broadcast Protocol
by J. Gordon Beattie, Jr., N2DSY
Abstract: This paper first identifies the packet radio broadcast functions and operating environment. The apparent simplicity of broadcast protocols can be deceiving. Issues such as the recovery of lost data segments must be addressed in an efficient manner. The must be done with care if the protocol is to be robust and maintain a nearmaximum throughput to be practical for file distribution and conferencing. The protocol defined in this paper uses a selective retransmit request capability which allows the users operating without an error to receive subsequent segments while retransmission of the errored segments continues on a round-robin basis. The protocol also provides a control capability (to be defined in a future document) used to establish broadcast file transfers and conferences.

Proceedings Paper



License-Free Spread Spectrum Packet Radio
by Albert G. Broscius, N3FCT
Abstract: Under Part 15.126 of CFR Title 47 the FCC has authorized the use of unlicensed spread spectrum transmitters with output power not to exceed one watt in the 902-928 MHz, 2400 MHz, and 5800 MHz bands shared by the amateur service. Several manufacturers have already offered products which have been approved by the FCC for this class of operation. Although this is not ham technology authorized by Part 97 of the FCC Rules, it may be advantageous for amateurs to be aware of the use and possibilities of such equipment to augment our regulated packet communications. Conversely, the proliferation of unlicensed transmitters in these amateur shared bands could spell trouble for weak signal work in densely populated areas.

Proceedings Paper



The Implications of High-Speed RF Networking
by Mike Chepponis, K3MC, Glenn Elmore, N6GN, Bdale Garbee, N3EUA, Phil Karn, KA9Q, and Kevin Rowett, N6RCE
Abstract: High-Speed networking is qualitatively different from the 1200 baud omnidirectional multicasting now in widespread use. A true network of high-speed nodes require planning, and (at least from the Amateur prespective) unusual networking architrectures to take advantage of the much higher speeds. Fundamental limitations on network parameters must be understood, and parameters possible with truly high-speed networks are also qualitatively different from what is provided by slower networks, offering a tremendously exciting future for amateur radio as a whole.

Proceedings Paper



Local Distribution in the Amateur Radio Environment
by F. Davoli, A. Giordano, I1TD, and S. Zappatore, IWlPTR
Abstract: Packet radio is often used as a means of accessing computing facilities or, more generally, a larger terrestrial network. In this respect, it can be seen as a forrn of local distribution. Similarly, intelligent repeaters interconnecting stations that are not in one another's hearing range can be thought of as performing an analogous function. Whenever this is the case, alternatives to the popular CSMA access protocol may be considered, that are better suited to work in a semi-centralized environment. In this paper, we describe some versions of one of these protocols (R-ISA), and its integration with higher layer ones.

Proceedings Paper



Implementation of a 1 Mbps Packet Data Link
by Glenn Elmore, N6GN and Kevin Rowett, N6RCE
Abstract: Presented is the design and the authors' experiences with implementation of an Amateur Radio Packet Data Link operating at one megabit/sec. The technology used is FSK modulation of Gunnplexors in the 10GHz amateur RF allocation. The digital interface is to an IBM PC bus using the PCLAN (SYTEK 6120) adapter card running the KA9Q implementation of TCP/IP suite of protocols.

Proceedings Paper



A Personal Packet Radio Mailbox Using Roserver
by Andrew Funk, KB7UV
Abstract: This paper describes use of ROSErver-Packet Radio MailBox System by Brian Riley, KA2BQE, as a Personal Packet Radio MailBox. ROSErver has features specifically intended for this application. Personal MailBoxes, when operated correctly, enhance the Amateur Radio Packet Network.

Proceedings Paper



Design of a Next-Generation Packet Network
by Bdale Garbee, N3EUA
Abstract: Current amateur packet radio experience centers around 1200 baud half-duplex AFSK operation for both local and long-haul use. Technologies are discussed that have the potential to effect a fundamentally different environment for the next generation of packet networking. A preliminary proposal is made for an example network configuration in the Rocky Mountain Region. Applications, ramifications, and problems facing the new network are discussed.

Proceedings Paper



RADIOSERVER - A Package for TNC Access to a LAN in a UNIX System
by A. Giordano, I1TD and S. Zappatore, IWlPTR
Abstract: A software package is described that interfaces a Terminal Node Controller (TNC) to a computer (host) running the 4.2 BSD Unix Operating System, over a serial line. An OM-shell is opened for every incoming AX.25 connection to the TNC so that the remote user nceds only a terminal to log in a HAM devoted environment. Some utilities are then offered by the OM-shell and among others the possibility to issue telnet-like commands to the hosts and gateways of the Department LAN.

Proceedings Paper



A Study of High Speed Packet Radio
by Roy E. Gould, N5RG
Abstract: Some of the possible transmission methods that could be used in the hiqh speed packet radio network are discussed and analyzed. The conclusion is reached that a good approach is to directly FSK the RF carrier at 38.4 Kbaud. A 100KHz bandwidth channel above 220Mhz should be used and a scrambler should not be used. The radio should be designed using modern IC's that a simple and relatively inexpensive yet high performance radio results.

Proceedings Paper



Prioritized Acknowledgment (PRIACK) Protocol
by Eric Gustafson, N7CL
Abstract: For the last several years I have been trying to advocate a very minor change to the AX.25 protocol. This change will allow the protocol to be much more compatible with our multiple access half duplex radio channels. I requested that the digital committee consider including this change in the protocol specification. The committee indicated that the idea might have some merit. They suggested that I get some test code written to try it out on the air. Since that time, I have worked with Howard Goldstein, N2WX to get some beta test code written so that this prioritized acknowledgement (PRIACK) channel access system could be evaluated on the air. What follows is a very non-rigorous description of the modified protocol.

Proceedings Paper



Routing, Oh Where is My International Routing
by William C. Hast, TI3DJT
Abstract: After looking at the state of network routing and they way the present networking schemes work I at times wonder if we are not going from bad to worse.

Proceedings Paper



KA9Q Internet Protocol Package on the Apple Macintosh
by Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP and Doug Thom, N60YU
Abstract: The KA9Q Internet Protocol Package has been out for several years now and has made a decided impact on amateur packet radio. It has been implemented on several personal computer platforms, with the large majority of hams using it on IBM PC's and its clones. This article describes its implementation on the Apple Macintosh family of personal computers. The unique Macintosh user interface and its proper utilization by the KA9Q software has proved to be quite a challenge. We hope that users of our implementation will be pleased with the results.

Proceedings Paper



Protocol Level 8 or What About the User?
by Lyle Johnson, WA7GXD
Abstract: In 1981, Amateur packet radio was highly experimental. As late as 1984 there were serious questions of packet's viability as a useful mode in Amateur radio. The early days of the packet revolution were filled with digital zaelots proclaiming the virtues of the new mode. Their fervoe spread, and Amateurs by the thousands climbed aboard the bandwagon. In 1989, with well over 100,000 TNCs in daily use in Amateur stations around the world, there is no doubt that packet is here to stay. The question now ? Is packet to be useful to Communicators, or will it remain in the domain of the Techies?

Proceedings Paper



Thoughts on an Adaptive Link Level Protocol
by Lyle Johnson, WA7GXD
Abstract: A look at HF channel conditions and historic Amateur radio practice reveals weaknesses in current packet radio link level protocol implementations. In line with the author's views of how protocols should work (see Level 8 Protocols elsewhere in these Proceedings), some features of ALink90, an experimental link-level protocol, are described.

Proceedings Paper



Tucson Amateur Packet Radio packetRADIO Project
by Greg Jones, WD5IVD
Abstract: This paper will discuss the Tucson Amateur Packet Radio packetRADI0 project. Technical and design considerations will be explained and discussed. Beta-testing of the radio project will be outlined.

Proceedings Paper



Amateur TCP/IP in 1989
by Phil Karn, KA9Q
Abstract: This paper is a report on the status of the KA9Q Internet Protocol package, also known as NET. Most of the items proposed in last year's paper have been completed, and additional features have also been implemented by the author and other contributors. The use of TCP/IP with the WA4DSY 56kb/s modems is also discussed, along with some ideas on channel access methods that would improve the efficiency of these modems.

Proceedings Paper



OSI Services on TCP/IP Networks
by Anders Klemets, SM0RGV and Stephen Pink, KFlY
Abstract: This paper describes the design and implementation of a method for providing upper-layer OSI services on top of a TCP/IP/AX.25 protocol stack. The tools for the project include the KAgQ Internet package in common use today in amateur packet radio, and ISODE, an ISO development package designed for wire-based networks but modified for packet radio use. The method used is described in DARPA/Internet RFC-1006 and is a standard for those in the Internet community who implement ISO protocols using TCP/IP based networks.

Proceedings Paper



ATS-3 Packet Experiments: The Potential Impact of Packet Radio upon Pacific Basin Communications
by Gerald A. Knezek, KB5EWV and Greg Jones, WD5IVD
Abstract: Most amateurs do not realize the impact that packet radio is having upon communications outside the amateur community. This paper discusses current packet experiments taking place over NASA's ATS-3 satellite with respect to the system's potential for providing low cost data communications to remote Pacific Islands.

Proceedings Paper



ARES/Data UPDATE: A Packet Radio Database for Emergency Communications with Conference Bridge
by W.E. Moerner, WN61, Sharon Moerner, N6MWD, and David Palmer, N6KL
Introduction: ARES/Data is a multiple-connect, multiple-port specialized bulletin board system with a conference bridge that is tailored to store and retrieve basic information about people, places, or things in an emergency or disaster. The current program (version 1.0) contains several enhancements not included in ARES/Data version 0.1 [see Moerner, W. E., & Palmer, D. (1988), ARES/Data: A Packet Radio Database for Emergency Communications, Proceedings of the Seventh ARRL Computer Networking Conference, 141-1441. [Note: For those interested in the history of ARES/Data, see the above mentioned article and also see Moerner, W. E., Moerner, S., & Palmer, D. (1987), Family Information Database for Emergency Responders, Proceedings of the Sixth ARRL Computer Networking Conference, 131-141.]

Proceedings Paper



ROSE X.25 Network Growth
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY
Introduction: The ROSE X.25 Packet Switch has been a developing project over many years. There have been many groups that have aided in the testing of the software. Without the efforts of these groups the switch would not have been as successful as is now is.

Proceedings Paper



The ROSE X.25 Packet Switch
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY
Abstract: The ROSE X.25 Packet Switch is the product is many years of effort and experience in the data communications market. The design goal was to provide a state of the art networking device that could clearly be used as a building block in the creation of a global amateur data network. The switch is a very reliable and efficient alternative for amateur packet radio networking. There are currently at least fifty (50) switches in operation throughout the world. It is felt by many groups that it is the best solution for amateur packet networking.

Proceedings Paper



Using the ROSE X.25 Packet Network
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY
Abstract: The Radio Amateur Telecommunications Society (RATS) is dedicated to the improvement of communications systems in the Amateur Radio Service. This objective has been guided by individuals who are willing to develop software, operate, and use systems which push the current state of the art. Our packet switch, the ROSE X.25 Packet Switch, and communications server, ROSErver/PRMBS, have from their inception been ambitious projects providing increased functionality to the users and network management. These systems were developed to support communications using conventional packet radio equipment. Any AX.25 TNC user can access a network of ROSE switches, and likewise any WORLI-compatible packet bulletin board system can exchange mail with ROSErver/PRMBS.

Proceedings Paper



AMTEX - NAVTEX-Like Dissemination Procedures for Amateur Radio
by Paul Newland, AD7I
Abstract: This paper outlines procedures for transmitting and receiving amateur radio bulletins via MF/HF radio that are compatible with NAVTEXl equipment. NAVTEX transmissions are made using AMTOR FEC with specific character strings at the beginning and end of messages. These character strings permit receiving equipment to identify and ignore messages that have already been received without error. It's estimated that over 20000 amateur radio operators already have NAVTEX decoding equipment. As of this writing both the AEA PK-232 and MFJ-1278 multi-mode controllers have the ability take full advantage of transmissions compatible with NAVTEX. These decoders could be used to provide automatic reception of amateur radio bulletins without repeatedly printing the same message during subsequent broadcasts. It's a simple matter for any MF/HF amateur radio station that transmits bulletins using AMTOR FEC to include the proper strings at the beginning and end of messages so that those messages become NAVTEX compatible. This paper outlines transmission and reception procedures that are compatible with existing NAVTEX decoders.

Proceedings Paper



A Multi-Channel IBM PC Packet Interface
by Henk Peek, PA0HZP
Abstract: This paper describes a universal medium speed packet interface for the Isa (IBMPC) bus. The system consists of one or more 4 channel Isa bus boards and external modems. Multiple boards can be interconnected to form one single interface with a single interrupt vector and daisy chain interrupt priority logic. General software can be used. There are no special initialization actions required. The connections between the Isa bus boards and the external modems are opto isolated.

Proceedings Paper



Design and Implementation of an AppleTalk Local Area Network Bridge
by R. Ramsey and W. Kinsner, VE4WK
Abstract: This paper presents the design and successful implementation of a local area network bridge based on the link layer AX.25 packet radio protocol and the AppleTalk Personal Network on the Macintosh computer. Operated as a duplex communication channel between interconnected networks of computers, the packet radio system provides the transmission of the network layer data packets. A working prototype of the bridge was developed for slow rates. A higher-speed bridge will require a faster packet radio and faster hardware for the bridge.

Proceedings Paper



DAMA - A New Method of Handling Packets?
by Detlef J. Schmidt, DK4EG
Abstract: Lately it seems we are hearing more and more stories about hams who are having trouble using their local node or digipeater. It seems that the user has no trouble hearing the digi, but the digi doesn't seem to hear the user at all. Several different experiments have been made to overcome this dilemma on amateur packet radio. One possible solution that is being pursued is through the use of full duplex digipeaters.

Proceedings Paper



Application Software for Packet Radio
by Robert Taylor, KA6NAN and Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP
Abstract: To date, there has been little use made in amateur packet radio of application software to provide a wide variety of services to the packet community. Most packet software delivers a limited range of capabilities such as file transfers, mail and database queries (White Pages). We feel that the use of higher levels of applications software is possible even given the constraints of today's packet speeds, that can offer a wider range of services. We use a program called Packet Chess to demonstrate how such services can be delivered. Packet Chess demonstrates how it is possible to have a real-time game operate over packet with a graphical user interface and at low data transfer speeds.

Proceedings Paper



Callsign Server for the KA9Q Internet Protocol Package
by Douglas Thom, N60YU and Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP
Abstract: One of the problems we found with packet communications, after we did a few keyboard to keyboard connections and log-ins to BBS's, was what else does it do for us? We can send mail to all these people out there in packet land that we do not know, or we can watch messages fly by that don't interest us.. What is missing is a true user application. Hmm... We thought, there has to be something we can do for the packet community. One afternoon, we were logged into the Internet (a world wide computer network) and saw a message that a group of people were putting a project together to acquire a copy of the Amateur Radio Callsign database from the F.C.C. Great, here it is.... We could put together a service whereby people could contact a packet station, and lookup a callsign. This could be an interesting service, and if successful, provide something of use to the community. Since we knew one of the people involved in getting the data, we contacted him, and got a copy of the database. As it turned out, the actual data file is 108 Megabytes in size and contains over 435,000 callsigns.

Proceedings Paper



A Brief Report on the Implementation of ROSE Networking
by Barry E. White, VK2AAB
Abstract: When Net-Rom first became available this association obtained the software and installed it in two repeaters, VK2RPH in Sydney and VK2RPN in Newcastle 100 miles north of Sydney. The tests were successful even though we did not reach the stage of having a uhf link installed. However we received the "WORD" from the Department of Communications that the software was in breach of the regulations in that the repeaters at one end adopted the callsigns of the users and at the other end did not identify both users. We therefore had to remove Net-Rom forthwith. I would like to take the opportunity to publicly thank Software 2000 for their help and consideration to our organisation at that time. Their response was beyond what could reasonably expected of any organisation.

Proceedings Paper



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