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Publications:

ARRL and TAPR 27th DCC 2008

General notes:

Copies of the papers presented at, or published for DCC are available in various ways. A paper printed in the proceedings will be available for purchase in most cases in hard copy as the DCC proceedings. It will in most cases also be available as an individual paper in PDF format as a free download via a link below the abstract (where available) It may also be available on CD-ROM. A paper printed in the proceedings may not have been presented at the conference. Also a presentation at DCC may not be in the printed proceedings. In those cases it may be available on DVD, CD-ROM or as a MP3 download. Links to what is available will be on the page specific to the particular year's DCC.

27th.gif The price for the TAPR and ARRL 27th Digital Communications Conference 2008 Proceedings is:

    $ 20 US +applicable shipping/handling.
(Place Web Order) (This link takes you to lulu.com)


27th ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference September 26-28, 2008

Location:
Chicago, IL

Coordinators:
Steve Bible, N7HPR, Conference Manager

Hosted by:
Mark Thompson, WB9QZB
Kermit Carlson, W9XA


Abstracts:
27th ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference
September 26-28, 2008

EcomScs and GateWayScs AX25 Packet Radio E-Mail
by John Blowsky KB2SCS
Abstract: EcomScs and GateWayScs are two stand alone programs that I have created. EcomScs is a Packet Radio E-Mail Client. Everything that you can do with your internet E-Mail client you can do with EcomScs. GateWayScs is a Packet Radio Internet E-Mail gateway. GateWayScs makes it possible for EcomScs to send and receive Internet E-Mails. GateWayScs and EcomScs combined replaces my Both Way Radio Internet Email (BWRIE)

Proceeding Paper

A Brief Introduction to Delay Tolerant Networking
by Frank Brickle AB2KT
Abstract: Delay Tolerant Networking is the art and science of moving bits around in bad situations, such as between distant endpoints in deep space, or among unknown mobile users at uncertain positions. We give a brief introduction to the technology that has been developed to provide network connectivity in such situations.

Proceeding Paper

Frequency and Other New Initiatives in APRS since 2004
by Bob Bruninga WB4APR - TAPR/ARRL/AMSAT/USNA
Abstract: Too many hams seem to have completely misunderstood APRS and think of APRS as just a vehicle tracking system that transmits GPS coordinates. When in fact, APRS is exactly the opposite. APRS is a receive and display system for the distribution and display of relevant immediate information of use to the mobile operator and others in VHF range. Now that we have another major manufacturer implementing APRS, it is time to get public perceptions back on track! My response to those people who think of APRS as a tracking system is that the tracking-only application is a relatively dead-end way of thinking about ham radio, and no wonder they are not interested, because in most cases, no one really cares where they are. But flip it around, focus on the receipt and display of local ham radio information and APRS represents the epitome of ham radio. It is receiving signals and information pertaining to every aspect of Ham radio in the immediate VHF surrounding area that is the joy of APRS. A single national calling channel and information resource to everything happening in the local area.

Proceeding Paper

Avoid Infrastructure by Centralized Polling of Emcomm Email
by Andre Hansen K6AH - Amateur Radio Emergency Service, San Diego Section
Abstract: The San Diego ARES Emergency Medical Services (EMS) sub-group utilizes the Winlink 2000 system for medical message handling. The Winlink 2000 system has a dependency on Internet infrastructure which may not exist in a regional disaster. Secondly, message density has increased to the point where trauma-center teams often have to wait for the channel. Winklink 2000 could address this by adding channels and RMS nodes, but not without a further dependence on infrastructure. This paper describes a proof-of-concept test on an old idea: central polling of mail clients as a means of maximizing the traffic on the channel.

Proceeding Paper

Digital speech within 100 Hz bandwidth
by Mike Lebo N6IEF
Abstract: To modify and write code needed to convert analog voice into narrow band digital modulation. The bandwidth of voice is about 2400 Hz. When speech could be reduced to 100 Hz, the gain would be 13.8 dB (24X). Processing gain by a computer is cost free. This project receives weak signals 10 dB (10X) below SSB (Single Side Band) noise floor of the radio.

Proceeding Paper

D-STAR® Uncovered
by Peter Loveall AE5PL
Abstract: D-STAR® is a digital streaming over-the-air protocol developed by the Japan Amateur Radio League, Inc. (JARL) which supports Ethernet at 128 kbps (DD) and digital voice at 4800 bps (DV). DV uses 3600 bps for voice (2400 AMBE encoding, 1200 bps FEC) and 1200 bps for synchronization and multiuse (approximately 900 bps is available for general use). DD provides an encapsulated Ethernet bridge for connecting two or more Ethernet clients over RF. We will explore this bit streaming protocol, its primary components, and current implementations. This paper explores the protocol from a technical, not subjective, viewpoint.

Proceeding Paper

A Protocol for Multicast Weather Data Distribution Over AX.25
by Nick Luther, K9NL
Abstract: A protocol is described for use on top of AX.25 in order to form multicast, push-architecture, regulatory compliant, radio weather data links. This protocol is especially suited to disseminating NEXRAD weather surveillance radar data over 1200 baud AFSK VHF radio links. Further, a larger scale system for distributing weather data using various means, among them radio links using this protocol, is discussed along with the current status of its implementation. Using the defined protocol over a radio link along with other system components, it is possible to ingest NEXRAD data from fast, operational data sources and to relay that data to severe weather spotter resources in a timely fashion, even when those resources have no access to the Internet or other data network infrastructure.

Proceeding Paper

WINMOR…A Sound Card ARQ Mode for Winlink HF Digital Messaging
by Rick Muething KN6KB AAA9WK - Winlink Development Team
Abstract: The improving computational performance of PCs and the near real-time response of PC operating systems now make it feasible to implement reasonable performance HF ARQ messaging protocols suitable for digital messaging. While Pactor (I, II, III) currently dominate and generally represent the best available performance, PC sound cards with appropriate DSP software can now begin to approach Pactor performance at lower cost than dedicated hardware HF modems. This paper covers the on-going development of an optimized sound card mode WINMOR, compatible with the popular Winlink 2000 message system1,2,3. This effort leverages a prior feasibility project by the author in the evaluation of SCAMP 4, an adaptation of RDFT for digital messaging systems. The paper reviews the development effort of WINMOR (WINlink Message Over Radio) from motivation through tool development, programming, testing and deployment in the WL2K system.

Proceeding Paper

Winlink 2000 – An Update
by Victor Poor W5SMM AAA9WL - Winlink Development Team
Abstract: A lot has happened in the evolution of Winlink 2000 (WL2K) since the paper I presented at the Des Moines DCC in 2004. That paper presented the then current architecture as well as the plans for changes to accommodate ARES and RACES emergency operations. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of its current design and implementation.

Proceeding Paper

Clocking the Data
by Jerry Shirar N9XR
Abstract: Many oscillators attached to the microprocessors and microcontrollers today are simply inverter stages intended to become Pierce-style oscillators. There are still many options and design considerations to make when attaching components onto the device to attain the desired results.

Proceeding Paper

A solar-powered telemetry system on base of a repeater
by Ioannis N. Vandikas SV2CPH - Technological Education Institute (T.E.I.) of Western Macedonia
Abstract: This paper presents an approach for collecting and transmitting thermal and electrical properties of a repeater, powered by a solar panel. The approach is characterized by high accuracy, low cost and low power consumption. The approach incorporates 2 sensors for voltage measurement, 2 sensors for current measurement 3 sensors for temperature measurement and one auxiliary sensor. We have found that the aforementioned configuration facilitates the process of collecting accurate measurements from the repeater. The core of the system is an MCU which collects measurements by converting analog signals to digital. Then it processes them and creates digital packets in accordance with the AX.25 protocol. Data is transmitted in a rate of 1200Baud with an AFSK configuration in the VHF zone. The data can be decoded by any Narrow FM receiver with a TNC or by a computer with a sound card. The thermal sensors offer an accuracy of 1oC, while the voltage sensor an accuracy of 0.1V. Finally yet importantly the current sensor offers an accuracy of 0.18%.

Proceeding Paper

It’s the Network
by Erik Westgard, NY9D
Abstract: Viewed in traditional Amateur Radio terms, the average cellular telephone handset is not very impressive. It has limited RF power output, a fixed, built in antenna, and you can’t even select the operating frequency. These devices do though leverage billions of dollars in worldwide network investment. Until Amateur Radio starts to think beyond just home stations and at more fixed infrastructure and networking, our emergency communications capabilities, particularly in the digital arena, will be limited.

Proceeding Paper

Using Udpcast to IP Multicast Data over Amateur Packet Radio Networks
by Paul D. Wiedemeier, Ph.D., KE5LKY and Clarke M. Williams, Jr. - The University of Louisiana at Monroe, Computer Science and Computer Information Systems Department
Abstract: Traditional data transmission software, including Winlink 2000, AirMail, FTP, and SCP, use point-topoint unicast to transmit data between two computers attached to the same network. Unfortunately significant time is required to transmit data from one computer to multiple computers when using unicast. During disasters and crises, minimizing the time to disseminate data is vital. Thus, to transmit data efficiently, point-to-multipoint multicast data transmission software should be used. In this paper we discuss how to multicast data over amateur packet radio networks using the Udpcast file transfer tool. Udpcast was written for both the UNIX/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems, and is widely used within the UNIX/Linux community to transmit operating system images from one computer to multiple computers attached to the same network. Additionally, any computer can use the Udpcast udp-sender and udp-receiver commands to transmit data or receive data. For these two main reasons, we advocate using Udpcast to multicast data over amateur packet radio networks during emergencies.

Proceeding Paper

Writing for Publication — It’s Not Rocket Science
by Larry Wolfgang, WR1B - ARRL and QEX Editor
Abstract: Potential authors have interesting projects or technical expertise to share with other Amateur Radio operators, but they are reluctant to write an article for publication. Some authors may feel intimidated by the prospect of submitting an article, while others see writing as time away from developing another project. Everyone has a story about something they have done, and those stories can be fascinating, but only if they are shared with others. This presentation describes the basic steps involved in writing an article for publication. With a clear set of guidelines, more authors will be willing to take on the task of writing about their work and sharing their knowledge.

Proceeding Paper

DVDs of the presentations at the 27th DCC are available:

Click the image to go to Gary's website to order the DVDs.

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